Jack Ivey

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Clippings and pictures

from

Jack Ivey, AHS 1956

 

~ The Last Air Show In Albany ~   ~ The Last Air Show In Albany ~     ~ The Last Air Show In Albany ~     ~ The Last Air Show In Albany ~

 

 

with

captions by

Martha LeSueur Nicholson, AHS 1956

 

It was a spectacular sight on May 5-6, 1973 at Naval Air Station, Albany…formerly Turner Air Force Base…when the Navy’s Blue Angels headlined the last air show in Albany. Sharing the spotlight with the Blue A’s were famous stunt pilots Bob Hoover and Corky Fornof, the Flying Pierces wing walkers, and our own Jack Ivey (’56) with his Pitts Special Aerobatics and Dan Stevens (’53) with his model airplanes.

Shown below are clippings from the air show program and local newspapers of each of their events.

 

    

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Dan continued to work with the Model Airplane Club and build and fly models until his death in 2008. He served as a crew member for the Thunderbirds during his Air Force years, and was known for his expertise in building complicated planes. His ashes were scattered on the club’s flying field in a memorial service fly in on October 11, 2008.

 

 

 

 

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Jack continued to build and fly stunt planes in various air shows all over the US from Las Vegas to Indiana to Wisconsin. He restored this vintage WWII fighter plane to reflect original combat colors and markings, named it Booby Trap in typical “flyboy” style, and flew it in shows around the country. He spent 8 years flying in air shows and logged approximately 6,000 hours flying time as well as operating a very successful sign business in Albany.

 

 

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In 1985, as an active experimental aircraft pilot, Jack flew with Ayres Corp. pilot, Bill Brodbeck, as National Aeronautical Assn. designated timekeeper when they achieved 3 world records in time to climb in the Ayres built Turbo Thrush shown in this clipping. This high powered crop duster is used in mountainous areas where climbing quickly with a heavy load is necessary.

 

The records are listed in Aviation and Space Records and still stood at the time of Brodbeck’s death earlier this year.

 

 

 

 

 

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